A Travellerspoint blog

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A Flying Visit To Frisco

Sightseeing in Dallas-Fort Worth in 2004


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & Bermuda & 2004 Peripetic Summer on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

On 5 May 2004, after we recovered a bit from our last harrowing trip up the ICW, Stressful Spring we took a trip up to Ellicott City to get our accumulated mail from our oldest daughter who had been taking care of that for us. We also got to watch our grandson at a Coach Pitch Little League game.
Grandson at coach pitch batting lefty

Grandson at coach pitch batting lefty


and on May 14th, we went up to the Mercedes diesel mechanic to have my car repaired. We visited my mother and drove through Baltimore.
Statue in downtown Baltimore

Statue in downtown Baltimore


Baltimore has lots of monuments. One nickname is the Monumental City. This photo is of the statue of John Mifflin Hood, early president of the Western Maryland Railway. Mr. Hood played an important role in shaping the Western Maryland Railroad (it became a "Railway" after 1911) into a strategic "bridge line" that linked the Port of Baltimore with western points. During his stewardship, Western Maryland passenger trains also used the Pennsylvania Railroad line from the west, stopping at Pennsylvania Station, to reach the Western Maryland's Hillen Station in downtown. The statue is unusual because few statues were ever commissioned to honor men of the railroad industry. Some people think it should be at Pennsylvania station instead of here.

Sunday May 16, 2004 Flying out

We decided to fly to Frisco, Texas to visit our youngest daughter.

Note: This Frisco is not short for San Francisco. Frisco was originally a retail and shipping point for farmers, and had a number of cotton gins and grain elevators. It still has some near the downtown area and the first time my daughter and SIL drove towards town, they did not believe that the area near the railroad tracks (which was the first place they came to) was an appropriate place to live because it looked so seedy and industrial.
Frisco Main Street

Frisco Main Street


Frisco was originally named Emerson, after Francis Emerson, who owned the farm where the townsite was located. Emerson, who was a banker, had promised to place a national bank in the town if it was named after him, but the bank was never established. Because the name Emerson resembled that of Emberson in Lamar County the name was changed in 1902 when the post office was established . So the town was named Frisco City after the St. Louis, San Francisco and Texas Railway Company, known as the Frisco system. Later the name was shortened to Frisco. Let that be a lesson to all you bankers. If you promise a bank, be sure you follow through.

There were several trips a day from BWI to DFW and since we didn't have any hotel reservations to deal with, we could do the trip quite reasonably by flying on non-rev on passes from our Miami airline pilot daughter. These passes cost her $50 for First Class tickets (we reimbursed her). She listed us (you have to be listed to fly even non-rev) on the 6:24 am flight.

We drove up to spend the night of 15 May with our oldest daughter that lives in Ellicott City, and she waked us up at O-Dark 30 in the morning and took us to the airport and dropped us off so that we were there more than a hour before the flight. We did get aboard and took off on a rainy overcast day.
taking off

taking off


Coming in to DFW airport at 8:24 am

Coming in to DFW airport at 8:24 am

Water towers sprout from the landscape

Water towers sprout from the landscape

Dallas neighborhoods

Dallas neighborhoods

Water tower coming to land at DFW

Water tower coming to land at DFW

Road coming in to airport 8:29 am

Road coming in to airport 8:29 am


We had a nice breakfast on the flight, and landed at 8:39 am local time.
Coming in on the taxiway 8:39

Coming in on the taxiway 8:39

Terminal building 8:41 am

Terminal building 8:41 am

Landing Bridge 8:41 am

Landing Bridge 8:41 am


Our Texas daughter picked us up at the airport.

Our first item of business was to tour her house. They moved last year and this is our first visit. She has been watching a LOT of Trading Spaces and Changing Rooms - they've got paint effects
Sponged paint effects in the family room

Sponged paint effects in the family room

Paint effects in the dining room

Paint effects in the dining room


her daughters room is covered with butterflies,
Butterflies in our granddaughter's room

Butterflies in our granddaughter's room


and she's got a baseball diamond painted on her son's bedroom wall.
Ballfield mural in TX grandson's room

Ballfield mural in TX grandson's room


When our son-in-law and the kids got home from Sunday School, we had lunch
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and then went to our grandson's T-ball game. (T-ball is the level before Coach Pitch as this grandson is a couple of years younger than our oldest daughter's son.) Our son-in-law was coaching first base and then he switched to third base and our daughter took over at first
daughter coaching first base

daughter coaching first base

son in law at third

son in law at third

Grandson and son-in-law at third

Grandson and son-in-law at third


The T-ball game was in a large recreational park.
Warren center lake with children playing catch

Warren center lake with children playing catch


Warren is a 110 acre parkland with a lake which was originally used to water cattle in the late 60s. The lake is 8 acres and 16 foot deep and is stocked with large mouth black bass, channel catfish and sunfish. Fishing is catch and release. There is no swimming. There is a paved trail around the lake where people ride bikes or skateboard or jog.

Monday May 17, 2004

The next day, we started our normal routine for the week. After breakfast, our daughter walked her son to school along with their boxer, with her daughter in a stroller. Bob usually walked with them.
Walking to school

Walking to school


Then we set out to tour Frisco. First we drove to PetSmart where we got dog food and she drove us out to the first location where the TV show Dallas was filmed (before the place burned down and they moved to filming at South Fork).

The first five shows of the TV series "Dallas" back in April 1978 used aerial footage of the "Southfork ranch"
e79f3340-a57f-11e8-96f7-6face3f20746.jpg
which was an actual ranch building on the Brinkman Ranch in Frisco, Texas. Then the house they used burned down. The owner hastily started to rebuild it.
Semi finished section

Semi finished section


But the producers of the show needed to have the some footage of the ranch house before he could finish it. Or they didn't think it could be finished in time so the location was changed to "Southfork" in Parker TX. The owner of the Brinkman ranch just stopped rebuilding at that point and has left it half finished. My daughter saw it and thought it was some kind of open air pavillion.
Half rebuilt ranch house - Frisco

Half rebuilt ranch house - Frisco


There is an inset in the picture so you can see that you can look right through the house. You can drive by the ranch which is still a working ranch,
gate

gate


bImage011.jpgpart of the ranch

part of the ranch


and you can see the house from the road. The "Southfork" ranch in Parker TX IS open to the public - however this one is not.

Our daughter said that there were a lot of scupltures in Frisco including one of some longhorns. So we drove around and saw some of them
Origins-Early ranching

Origins-Early ranching

large_51756620-a582-11e8-88a9-eb4b3b295b1e.jpglarge_4b6b87f0-a582-11e8-96f7-6face3f20746.jpgCowboy

Cowboy

Shawnee Trail sign

Shawnee Trail sign

Shawnee Trail

Shawnee Trail


including this one of a stampede. I don't think the cowboys and steers are as well done as the ones in Dallas, nor do I think the horses are as good as the ones at Los Colinas.
Longshot of the stampede

Longshot of the stampede


Stampeding longhorns sculpture in

Stampeding longhorns sculpture in

Modern road behind sculpture

Modern road behind sculpture

Frisco stampede sculpture

Frisco stampede sculpture

Steers breaking through the wall

Steers breaking through the wall


Bas relief steers with daughter and granddaughter

Bas relief steers with daughter and granddaughter

Bas relief showing the lightening stampeding the steers

Bas relief showing the lightening stampeding the steers

large_9878c2f0-a583-11e8-88a9-eb4b3b295b1e.jpg
granddaughter

granddaughter


Cattle Drive is located in Central Park and is a tribute to the late 19th century cattle drive and life on The Shawnee Trail, which was the first north-south cattle trail in Texas that came through this area. Gaylord Properties, the developer of Frisco Bridges, intentionally designed the 7.3-acre park in the shape of a longhorn.

She also drove us over to Plano to see where her husband works.
Son-in-law's office

Son-in-law's office

grounds of his workplace

grounds of his workplace


They rent some of the land out for a horse farm so that they can have an agriculture use permit.
Plano water tower

Plano water tower

Star Center

Star Center


In the afternoon, Bob and our daughter walked back to school to pick up our grandson and I stayed home with our granddaughter. Then we went to another T-ball game.
walking in to T-ball

walking in to T-ball


In this game, most confusingly, the other team also had red shirts, but they have white pants instead of tan. Our SIL was coaching again.

Our granddaughter slept completely through this game (I guess we wore her out at the Stampede). Afterwards our grandson wanted to eat at Wendy's so that's where we had dinner.
Bob and the cat

Bob and the cat

Tuesday, May 18, 2004

Our daughter doesn't like the style of her fireplace which she feels is too modern.
Living room fireplace

Living room fireplace


So after the walk to school, we set out to go to an architectural salvage yard in Dallas.
Daughter and granddaughter walking through the yard

Daughter and granddaughter walking through the yard

birdhouse from scraps

birdhouse from scraps

lamps

lamps


so we went to see what was available.
614dfc70-a5b3-11e8-862e-abfd11ae0c21.jpgMantle

Mantle

nImage015.jpgMantles

Mantles


After that, we drove around downtown Dallas
Reunion Tower

Reunion Tower

Dallas Morning News backed by the Belo building

Dallas Morning News backed by the Belo building


The Dallas Morning News developed from the Galveston News which was founded in 1842 by Samuel Bangs. Alfred H. Belo acquired control of the Galveston paper and wanted to expand to Dallas. When efforts to purchase the old Dallas Herald failed, Belo sent George Bannerman Dealey to launch a new paper, the Dallas Morning News which began publishing October 1, 1885. Linked across 315 miles by telegraph, and sharing a network of correspondents across the state, the Dallas Morning News and the Galveston News were the first two newspapers in the country to publish simultaneous editions. The News is also currently the only major daily in Dallas. Its closest and longest-lived rival, The Dallas Times Herald, went out of business in the early 1990s. This building faces Ferris Plaza on its south side. Above the front doors, engraved in large letters, is an admonition from longtime News Vice-President and General Manager George B. Dealey, which reads:

Build the news upon the rock of truth and righteousness. Conduct it always upon the lines of fairness and integrity. Acknowledge the right of the people to get from the newspaper both sides of every important question.
Dallas Morning News building

Dallas Morning News building


Flying horse from Pioneer Plaza

Flying horse from Pioneer Plaza


When you see the red horse, you know you are in Dallas. I tried to get a photo of the red Pegasus sign with a horse in the Pioneer Plaza group but the angles are wrong to get a sculpture horse's head together with the pegasus sign. A cowboy and horse was the best I could do
Cowboy and Pegasus

Cowboy and Pegasus


The "Pegasus" building was designed by Sir Alfred Bossom as the headquarters of the Magnolia Petroleum Company, predecessor to Mobil Oil (which is now part of Exxon). It was the tallest building west of the Mississippi. But by the time I visited in 1997, the building was dwarfed by the surrounding buildings, and the sign stopped rotating, and had been turned off. In 1997, the building was converted into a 330 room luxury hotel catering to the business traveler. The restored elevator lobby features a decorated gold leaf on a plaster ceiling and elevator doors that feature the Pegasus logo. As a part of the Dallas Millennium Celebration, the Flying Red Horse neon sign was rebuilt and relit at midnight to bring in 2000. The original sign has been put on display in a shed at the Dallas Farmer's Market.

We went over to Pioneer Plaza and looked at those longhorns which I saw for the first time in 1997 when I was at a convention in Dallas. Pioneer Plaza is the world's largest bronze sculpture of its kind and it depicts a cattle drive of 3 cowboys and 50 steers. Each piece was created by artist Robert Summers of Glen Rose, TX. This 4.2-acre plaza in front of City Hall and the Convention Center at Young and Griffin Streets was originally the site of the Shawnee Cattle Trail, begun in 1854. Fort Worth is really the 'cow town' in this area - Dallas OTOH is major center for oil and gas. Therefore, some felt that this sculpture was inappropriate to be in Dallas. But when in 1991, local businessman and philanthropist, Trammell Crow decided that this was the site for this park he apparently overruled all opposition.
From the parking lot

From the parking lot


There is a small parking lot at this park (which is free).
Pioneer Plaza

Pioneer Plaza

Daughter and granddaughter - against the tide

Daughter and granddaughter - against the tide


Touching the bronzes is discouraged (and if it is hot, you will only try it once) and sitting on them is not allowed.
large_1696496-Pioneer_Plaza_Dallas.jpgPioneer Plaza Longhorns

Pioneer Plaza Longhorns

large_1687294-Pioneer_Plaza_2004_Dallas.jpgLooking back toward city

Looking back toward city


large_1696501-Pioneer_Plaza_Dallas.jpgPioneer Cemetery with my granddaughter

Pioneer Cemetery with my granddaughter

large_1674502-Pioneer_Plaza_2004_Dallas.jpg1687208-Cowboy_part_of_the_sculpture_Dallas.jpg1645621-Pioneer_Park_sculpture_Frisco.jpg

Bob looking at the sculptures

Bob looking at the sculptures


Steers from above

Steers from above


Reunion Tower from street level

Reunion Tower from street level


We went up Reunion Tower for lunch and met the Mayor Laura Miller of Dallas on the way down. I do not even remember seeing Reunion Tower on my first visit to Dallas. This is especially astonishing because it is considered a signature building for Dallas and is 560 feet tall observation tower which is the 15th tallest building in Dallas. I also think it is amazing that it was constructed as a part of the Hyatt Regency Hotel. I've never heard of a tower associated with a hotel before. Another fact that was a bit surprising to me is that the Reunion tower is named for its location in the Reunion area, which was a settlement of French immigrants in the 19th Century.

The tower is constructed of poured in place concrete. Surrounding this top is a geodesic dome formed with aluminum struts. At the intersection of the aluminum members are 260 lights that are kept turned on most of the evening hours. However, at certain times during the evening, the lights flash to different patterns for a special light show.

The three levels at the top of the tower house different functions. The lowest level is the observation deck, known as The Lookout. Visitors can see the territory surrounding Dallas from indoor and outdoor areas. The outdoor area offers a 360 degree walk that is covered by the upper levels. Great views of the Dallas Skyline can be seen, as well as the skyline of Fort Worth, Las Colinas, and other groupings of buildings throughout the city. A nominal fee is charged to visitors. The fee is quite a bit less than other towers I've visited. On the second level is Antares, which is a full service restaurant operated by the Hyatt Regency Dallas. Antares offers lunch, dinner, and a Sunday brunch in an elegant and contemporary atmosphere. The Dome, a cocktail lounge, is located on Reunion's highest level.
Arena from the car

Arena from the car


We didn't park at the hotel, where the parking is $10 for 3 hours. Instead we parked at the Reunion lot for $3.00.
Parking lot

Parking lot


Parking Ticket

Parking Ticket


It is possible that this lot is not available if the Reunion arena is in use, and the lot is a bit rough and is semi-paved, but that's significantly cheaper. We walked a little bit over the pedestrian bridge to get to the Tower, and we might have walked less at the hotel. But not enough to make me want to pay an additional $7.00. It wasn't as if we had to walk up the tower.
walking from the parking

walking from the parking


Signs

Signs

View going up the elevator

View going up the elevator


Old Red from Reunion Tower

Old Red from Reunion Tower


In 1890, the construction of a courthouse (the 6th in Dallas and the 5th at this location) was begun at Main and Houston Streets. It was designed by M. A. Orlopp in the Romanesque style (I guess that is why it has turets) and originally had a clock tower. It was constructed of iron, brick and red sandstone so that it would be fireproof. It was finished about 1893. In 1919, the clock tower, which rivaled Big Ben, was removed because it was feared that the winds had made it unstable. By 1938, there were some people who thought the building had become obsolete and it should be torn down. It is now one of the oldest buildings in downtown Dallas-very different from most of the modern architecture, and is being restored as a historic landmark. The ambitious goal is to have at least one courtroom as it was originally and to put the clock tower and grand staircase back in place. Old Red is currently (2004)serving as a visitor's center (as the courthouse has been moved to a more modern building) and is to house the Old Red Museum of Dallas County History & Culture.
Court buildings from Reunion Tower

Court buildings from Reunion Tower


The building in the center of the picture (red brick with white trim is apparently the Dallas Criminal Court building. It was built in 1913 and served as the county jail for a period of time. Apparently Bonnie and Clyde were held here until their escape. They were later ambushed and killed in Louisiana and returned to Dallas where around 30,000 people came to view Clyde’s body and 40,000 to view Bonnie. Behind and on the right side are records buildings. The Texas School Book Depository (Sixth Floor Museum) is just on the edge of the photo on the left. Founder's Plaza and Kennedy Memorial Plazas are completely hidden from this perspective. I was mistaking the brick building on the other side of the street for the TSBD, but is the DalTex building. Some conspiracy theories have the JFK assassin on the roof of this building.
City Hall and Convention center area

City Hall and Convention center area


Plaza in front of Belo Building from Reunion Tower

Plaza in front of Belo Building from Reunion Tower

Dealey Plaza and School Book blg from Reunion

Dealey Plaza and School Book blg from Reunion

Reunion Arena from Reunion Tower

Reunion Arena from Reunion Tower


We parked next to Reunion Arena to go to Reunion Tower. I was somewhat taken aback to see that cameras are not allowed inside.
large_1677948-Reunion_Tower_Views_Dallas.jpgLooking into the distance (camera reflected)

Looking into the distance (camera reflected)

1677949-Reunion_Tower_Views_Dallas.jpg1677950-Reunion_Tower_Views_Dallas.jpgTwo views of my granddaughter

Two views of my granddaughter

My maverick steak sandwich

My maverick steak sandwich

American Airlines Arena from Reunion Tower

American Airlines Arena from Reunion Tower


The exterior of American Airlines Center is made of brick, limestone and granite and inside it is 840,000 square feet.
Restaurant

Restaurant

View and reflections

View and reflections


large_1696880-Downtown_Dallas_Dallas.jpg
One of the important aspects of Dallas is it's architecture. There are several websites which tell about the date built, architects and details of the buildings in downtown Dallas, I think the building in the center with the triangular top is one of I.M. Pei's Dallas buildings Fountain Place. I can't be absolutely sure of the identification of the other buildings, but in the general area with Fountain Place one might be able to see the Fairmont Hotel, the Dallas Museum of Art, Lincoln Plaza, and/or the Trammel Crow Center.
Downtown Dallas

Downtown Dallas


From the elevator going down

From the elevator going down


Heliocopter landing on roof nr Reunion Tower park

Heliocopter landing on roof nr Reunion Tower park


Then it was time to go back to Frisco and get our grandson from school.

It was finally warm enough to go swimming at
the pool across the street from our daughter's house.

the pool across the street from our daughter's house.

swimming pool

swimming pool


This time we ate dinner at
Dickey's

Dickey's


Barbecue Pit.

Barbecue Pit.

menu

menu

eating dinner

eating dinner

Frisco water tank

Frisco water tank


Old Frisco Water tower

Old Frisco Water tower

Wednesday, May 19, 2004

On Wednesday after the walk to school, we drove to Ft. Worth
Farm to Market road signs

Farm to Market road signs


Edited panorama of the street from the car

Edited panorama of the street from the car

Exchange Street

Exchange Street


and parked in the free lot,
Armour sign at the end of Exchange Street

Armour sign at the end of Exchange Street


Bob, daughter and gdaughter from parking lot

Bob, daughter and gdaughter from parking lot

Sign advertising Cowboy Cooking

Sign advertising Cowboy Cooking


and passed Stockyard Station (with railroad tracks through the center).
Ticket booth and water tank

Ticket booth and water tank

Railroad water tank

Railroad water tank

Engine turning

Engine turning


1664945-Longhorns_Fort_Worth.jpgLonghorns

Longhorns

1664943-Longhorns_Fort_Worth.jpgLonghorns prior to cattle drive

Longhorns prior to cattle drive


and then went to the visitor's center,
Bob and daughter and granddaughter -Visitor's Center

Bob and daughter and granddaughter -Visitor's Center

Billboard painted on the side of a building

Billboard painted on the side of a building

Star on Walk of Fame

Star on Walk of Fame


Chisholm Trail marker

Chisholm Trail marker


We did a little bit of shopping in the Stockyard Station
Grapevine /TarantelaTrain

Grapevine /TarantelaTrain


Engine coming into the station

Engine coming into the station

Newer engine in the station

Newer engine in the station


Train pulling into the station

Train pulling into the station

Train carriage

Train carriage

Bob, our daughter and granddaughter on a bench

Bob, our daughter and granddaughter on a bench


After that we watched the cattle drive. I went across the street and took pictures of them from over there.
1664946-Longhorns_Fort_Worth.jpg1664947-Longhorns_Fort_Worth.jpgLooking down Exchange Street - Fort Worth

Looking down Exchange Street - Fort Worth


Longhorns on Exchange Street

Longhorns on Exchange Street

Drover on horseback

Drover on horseback


1664948-Longhorns_Fort_Worth.jpgCattle drive passes by in Ft. Worth

Cattle drive passes by in Ft. Worth

1664949-Longhorns_Fort_Worth.jpg
We had lunch at Riskey's Steak House
Bob and daughter and granddaughter by Riskey's Steak House

Bob and daughter and granddaughter by Riskey's Steak House


Finchers from Risckey's

Finchers from Risckey's

Hotel from across the street

Hotel from across the street


Riskey's poster

Riskey's poster


Interior

Interior

Granddaughter with crayons

Granddaughter with crayons

Chicken Fingers and fries

Chicken Fingers and fries


Special $5.95 - beef patty, cantalope and potatoes

Special $5.95 - beef patty, cantalope and potatoes


Our granddaughter would pose on the horse merry-go-round, but wouldn't ride it.
BBQ and stagecoach ride

BBQ and stagecoach ride


posing with the horse

posing with the horse


1640195-Ritas_as_we_walked_by_Fort_Worth.jpgThree kinds of transportation in front of Rita's

Three kinds of transportation in front of Rita's

Man paying for parking

Man paying for parking


Then we headed back to pick up our grandson from school. That night we had dinner at La Hacienda
xImage128.jpgnImage127.jpg
They have games to play in the waiting room, and our granddaughter played with a bead game.
large_xImage130.jpg
Wagon wheel chandelier

Wagon wheel chandelier

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Then afterwards, our grandson got on the horse in the coin operated horse and carriage and our granddaughter consented to ride in the carriage.
grandson and granddaughter

grandson and granddaughter

Thursday May 20, 2004

On Thursday, we went to local hardware stores and lumber yards to see what kinds of mantle pieces our SIL could get to redo the mantle piece in his family room.
Guest room at our daughter's house

Guest room at our daughter's house


Other than that we rested
Bob relaxing

Bob relaxing


and played games, and our grandchildren went to the pool again.

Friday, May 21, 2004

As usual, while Bob and our daughter walked our grandson to school, I did email. After breakfast, we headed back downtown to Dallas to Old City Park which was closed on the day I took the city tour on my previous visit in 1997. Originally the City Park was set up in 1876 for the centennial. Now Old City Park has 38 structures built between 1840-1910 which have been brought in and set up on this site.

After we parked, we walked around the Park
Depot

Depot

Main Street store with advertisement

Main Street store with advertisement

Store on old Main Street

Store on old Main Street

Doctor's Office 1890

Doctor's Office 1890

Law Office on Main Street

Law Office on Main Street

Bank on Main Street

Bank on Main Street

Popcorn Wagon at Elm and Main Streets

Popcorn Wagon at Elm and Main Streets


1847 Miller Log Cabin

1847 Miller Log Cabin


This square notched log structure, which is now in Old City Park in Dallas was built in South Oak Clibb by William Brown miller and his slaves. It is typical of the houses built for temporary shelter on the frontier in Texas. It is constructed of oak and cedar, and has local limestone for the chimney.
large_146e99e0-a64f-11e8-897b-1d9b0486ff86.jpglarge_1325c630-a64f-11e8-897b-1d9b0486ff86.jpg
The buildings served as a home for the Millers for about 15 years nad then had a second life as one of the earliest schools in Dallas County. It is furnished primarily with Texas-made items.as it would have appeared when the early pioneers set up housekeeping.
granddaughter at Old City Park kiln

granddaughter at Old City Park kiln

Kiln

Kiln


Our daughter and granddaughter went in the 'tipi'

Our daughter and granddaughter went in the 'tipi'

Cellar House 1875

Cellar House 1875

Barn 1891

Barn 1891

Gate

Gate

Necessary House

Necessary House

Approaching Miller Playhouse 1908

Approaching Miller Playhouse 1908


The playhouse was built from logs cut on William Brown Miller's land on the banks of the Trinity River. He built this crude log structure in 1908 for his granddaughter Evelyn. The ceiling was raised in 1920 because Evelyn had grown too tall for the original height of the building. The pictures had to be taken through glass because it would be too easy for people to reach in and touch or worse take the objects inside
Inside Miller Playhouse

Inside Miller Playhouse


There were a lot of school children there on field trips, which was an advantage in one way, in that houses such as Millermore were open in the morning. for the school groups when they are usually closed at that time of day.
Porch Millermore House

Porch Millermore House


Parlor in Millermore House

Parlor in Millermore House


View from Millermore

View from Millermore


Room in Millermore

Room in Millermore


We saw gardens and a pottery shed (the costumed potter gave our granddaughter a small souvenir),
Potter at Old City Park

Potter at Old City Park


stables with horse, a blacksmith (and farrier), and giant mules,
Giant Jacks with Bob, and daughter

Giant Jacks with Bob, and daughter

Windmill at Old City Park

Windmill at Old City Park


Victorian houses,
Victorian home

Victorian home

George House, 1900

George House, 1900


sheep shearing,
Sheep shearing

Sheep shearing


and house with a garden and chickens.
Chickens

Chickens

First Person Interpreter Sign

First Person Interpreter Sign


First person interpreter

First person interpreter


Scarecrow and pavillion

Scarecrow and pavillion


Then we looked around for a place to have lunch. The school children have brought their sandwiches and have a picnic but we have not. There's no food for sale in Old City Park. We first looked in the International Market.
Two views of the International market

Two views of the International market


We eventually found a place called City Park Deli which used to be a Blimpie, and we ate there.
large_2608077-Roofline_Dallas.jpgMenu Board

Menu Board

Pseudo Blimpie

Pseudo Blimpie

When I was here in Dallas before, a bus tour took us to a coupe of blocks of Victorian houses. I have always been fascinated by Victorian architecture, so I wanted to come back. We went to Old City Park, because that was where I thought it was, but it was not. It was really the Wilson and the Beilharz Blocks.
Beilharz Block sign

Beilharz Block sign


The Historical Sign for the Wilson Block says:

"Swiss native Jacob Nussbaumer, a colonist in the Pioneer La Reunion settlement of the Dallas area, purchased this land prior to the Civil War. In 1898, his wife Dorothea and children sold it to her niece Henrietta Frichot Wilson (1864-1953), the daughter of La Reunion settlers. Henrietta and her husband Frederick P. Wilson (1863-1923) built their residence at this site in 1899 and later constructed six additional homes as rental property. Together the houses were the center of a residential area known as the Wilson block of Swiss Avenue. The neighborhood was the home of many early Dallas leaders, including Charles D. Hill, who became one of the area's prominent architects, and Dr. Theodore L E,. Arnold, an early Dallas ophthamologist whos son Charles pioneered in microphotography. The various architectural styles represented in the historic Wilson Block reflect Victorian and Queen Anne influences. The homes feature similarities in composition, including frame construction, clapboard siding, decorative shingle patterns, gabled roofs and intricate ornamentation. Today the Wilson Block serves as a reminder of Dallas' rich heritage and early development."

The homes here, restored on the outside, are leased to local non-profit organizations for offices.
Victorians of Beilharz and Wilson Blocks

Victorians of Beilharz and Wilson Blocks


513664671664466-Victorians_o..004_Dallas.jpg988612561664465-Victorians_o..004_Dallas.jpgDetail from one of the houses

Detail from one of the houses


House in the Swiss Avenue section

House in the Swiss Avenue section


Beilharz Block house 1997

Beilharz Block house 1997

Same house in 2004

Same house in 2004

1997 photo from the bus

1997 photo from the bus

2004 photo of the same house

2004 photo of the same house


We had dinner at the Texas Land and Cattle Restaurant.
Sunset

Sunset

Texas Land and Cattle at sunset

Texas Land and Cattle at sunset

Inside decor

Inside decor

Painting in the restaurant

Painting in the restaurant

Daughter and granddaughter

Daughter and granddaughter

Saturday, May 22, 2004

We packed and then our daughter drove us back to DRW where we took the 1300 flight home. We got on the plane OK (we have to wait until all the passengers who paid for tickets get on board) This was the flight that was the most open (vacant seats), although it filled up during the week.
Taxiway taking off 2:37 pm

Taxiway taking off 2:37 pm

DFW from the air

DFW from the air

1645375-Taking_off_from_DFW_Frisco.jpgFlying from DFW

Flying from DFW


We had a nice lunch on the plane (first class is nice). After we landed and got our luggage, we got a van back to our daughter's house in Ellicott City, picked up our car, and drove home. We had dinner at Pizza Hut on the way.
Bob going to Pizza Hut

Bob going to Pizza Hut

Posted by greatgrandmaR 11:26 Archived in USA Comments (0)

Driving to the 45th

Side Trip to Oberlin College Reunion


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & Bermuda & 2004 Peripetic Summer on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

When I attended Oberlin College (1955-1959), I lived for 3 years in the Grey Gables co-op. In 1969, when we were living in Philadelphia, I came out for our tenth reunion. I found out that Grey Gables had been torn down and there was nothing there but a grass lot. This made me very sad. (When I came back this year (2004) it was the Grey Gables parking lot)
Then on the left 1958 and Now in 2004

Then on the left 1958 and Now in 2004


I did most of the reunion activities, but I didn't really meet any of my good friends there, and so it wasn't much fun and I didn't really want to go back. And the time (Memorial Day weekend) hasn't been convenient what with children's graduations etc.

But my junior year roommate has been trying to get me to come for a reunion for several years. She was in the class of 1958, and we have 'cluster' reunions. This would be our last cluster together for some time (58-59-60) because in 2005 my cluster would be 59-60-61 and who knew if we would last until the 50th. So I gave in and convinced my husband to drive out there.

I tried to do it cheaply, so I only registered for a dorm room and for the picnic on Saturday night

Registration $25.00 each
Dorm Room $36.00 for two
Reunion Picnic $36.00 for two
and we were leaving Sunday morning to try to get partway home without having to fight too much Memorial Day traffic.

Thursday May 27, 2004 - Start of Oberlin Trip

In order to avoid the rush traffic on Friday, we started off on Thursday May 27th and took two nights to do the 530 mile trip.After we fueled up the car (diesel at $1.78/gal), we drove up through Croom to US 301, and from there to I-97. We took route 100 over to I-95, and then took I-70 west.
1497212.jpg
We stopped for lunch at McDonalds in New Market after 100 miles. Lunch for two was $6.54. We left McDonalds at 12:11 and at 1318 after another 65 miles, we stopped at the Sideling Hill Visitor's Center just west of Hancock. The Visitor's Center is free
I-68 climbing up to Sideling Hill

I-68 climbing up to Sideling Hill


When they constructed I-68, they cut through some of the hills. Sideling Hill is one of those places and it shows all the rock layers along the cut.
Rock layers exposed

Rock layers exposed


From picnic and parking area

From picnic and parking area


Directional sign for visitor's center

Directional sign for visitor's center


You can get to the Visitor's Center from the east bound side of the road by parking and walking across the pedestrian bridge.
Walkway from the east side to the west side

Walkway from the east side to the west side

I-68 from the Visitor's Center

I-68 from the Visitor's Center


Mountains from the Visitor's Center

Mountains from the Visitor's Center


Here we went to the bathroom, picked up brochures, and looked at the exhibits about the geology and geography of the area,
Mountain Vista - mountains that we see from the center are labeled

Mountain Vista - mountains that we see from the center are labeled


Rock core with animal fossil time line

Rock core with animal fossil time line


Board showing how you would have gotten over this mountain in the past - Vehicle, Road, and available construction equipment

Board showing how you would have gotten over this mountain in the past - Vehicle, Road, and available construction equipment

Rock layer model

Rock layer model

Walkway up to the mountain

Walkway up to the mountain

Looking down at the viewing area

Looking down at the viewing area


and left at 1343.
Bob walking back to our car

Bob walking back to our car


After we left the Visitor's Center we went on through Cumberland
From the bridge to the river

From the bridge to the river


d1cbb200-a3d1-11e8-a32b-9521c4fa6f60.jpg
and entered West Virginia a little before 1500 (3 pm)
d18f1e30-a3d1-11e8-a32b-9521c4fa6f60.jpg
Warning signs (5% gade) on I-68 in WV

Warning signs (5% grade) on I-68 in WV

Cheat Lake

Cheat Lake


and headed toward Morgantown to spend the night.

We got off at exit 7 of I-68 (we could see the Bob Evan's restaurant in the shopping center from the road) and got fuel in the car at BFS foods (9.35 gals of diesel at $1.86/gal).
OBFS building

OBFS building

Mall clock

Mall clock


We checked into the Super 8 about 1530 (3:30 pm)
Super 8 sign

Super 8 sign


after a total trip of 275 miles. Total room cost $68.75 including tax.
Bob lying on the bed

Bob lying on the bed


We were both too tired to actually go sightseeing like I had intended to do and the weather was sort of overcast. So we walked across the road (a feat in itself - walking was not a mode of transportation that the planners of this place had envisioned) to Outback Steakhouse for dinner ($42.15) instead of going downtown and walking along the river.
Bob walking to Outback

Bob walking to Outback

Map and toy inside Outback

Map and toy inside Outback


Ruby Tuesday across from the motel

Ruby Tuesday across from the motel

May 28, 2004 - Friday- Stop in East Liverpool

I realized that I had no maps for West Virginia or Ohio, and no really current information on Pennsylvania, but I thought that by the time I found it, the AAA would be closed on Thursday evening. So Friday morning, after our free breakfast at the hotel, we checked out at 0842 and got back on the interstate. We found the Morgantown AAA office at 0900, but it was closed until 1000, and we didn't want to wait. We picked up I-70, and, after an abortive attempt to contact the AAA office in Washington PA (I was using an old fashioned cell phone and calling numbers in the AAA book),
Morgantown from the highway

Morgantown from the highway

The road dips and curves

The road dips and curves

Looking up the hillside

Looking up the hillside


tunnel

tunnel

Exit 0

Exit 0

large_5b5f1680-a3d5-11e8-ae8f-3be563b3ceab.jpgOne way

One way

rain

rain


we crossed the Ohio River
Bridge over the Ohio

Bridge over the Ohio

large_5dab0250-a3d5-11e8-a32b-9521c4fa6f60.jpg
and by 1034 were driving up the river on Ohio State Route 7. I called (no GPS or computer mapping in those days) and got directions to the AAA office East Liverpool Ohio on my cellphone,
Approach to East Liverpool

Approach to East Liverpool


and once there got travel guides to PA/NJ; Mid Atlantic (MD, VA, DE, DC), and OH/ IL,/IN, and maps to PA, OH, and WV.

History of East Liverpool: In 1795. Thomas Fawcett bought land along the Ohio River from Isaac Craig and planned a town which he named St. Clair, after Authur St. Clair, Govenor of the Northwest Territory at the time. The town residents of St. Clair changed the name to Fawcettstown. In 1816, the name was changed again to Liverpool by nostalgic English potters. In 1834 when the town was incorporated, the town was renamed East Liverpool to avoid confusion with the Liverpool in Medina County Ohio. Because the area was surrounded by deposits of clay and coal, the city prospered and became well-known for its ceramics. At one time, "America's Crockery City" made half of the nations pottery. The the industry has declined since 1930. East Liverpool was the location for the capture and killing in 1934 of Pretty Boy Floyd, a 30's gangster.

After we picked up our maps and guidebooks, we left the car in the AAA parking lot (one of the few places in town where parking was free) and strolled around town a bit
Bob walking ahead of me to look for lunch

Bob walking ahead of me to look for lunch

Carnegie Library

Carnegie Library


Oberlin Ohio where I went to school has or had a Carnegie Library. It isn't the only one. There are111 libraries which were given to Ohioans by the steel king and philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie during the years 1898 to 1918.

This is the Carnegie Public Library in East Liverpool. I did not know what it was, although I thought it looked important. Beaver70 very kindly emailed me, "The building that you wondered about is (or was) the Carnegie Public Library. Spent many hours there growing up."

When I knew the name of it, I could find out about it. Their website says:

"The East Liverpool Carnegie Library at 219 E. 4th Street, East Liverpool, Ohio was erected on the Bradshaw Farm property, 199 E. 4th Street, East Liverpool...In 1899 two local businessmen contacted Andrew Carnegie concerning the possibility of a donation to the City of East Liverpool, in order to build a public library. Andrew Carnegie, by now a wealthy businessman and philanthropist, had spent much of his youth in East Liverpool with relatives. Construction of the building began in 1899 after a visit from Carnegie to the city. Designed by A. W. Scott of East Liverpool and constructed by Harvey McHenry the exterior of the building was complete in 1900. The Library was officially opened and dedicated on May 8, 1902."

Lou Holtz/ Upper Ohio Valley Hall of Fame

Lou Holtz/ Upper Ohio Valley Hall of Fame


This place was totally unexpected - I had never heard about it before. We didn't go in because we were in quest of lunch. I have found no reference to it in any travel literature but they do have a website. It says: "Founded Feb. 13, 1998

"The Lou Holtz/Upper Ohio Valley Hall of Fame was established to showcase individuals and communities throughout the region stretching from Western Beaver County in Pennsylvania to Wheeling, W.Va., for their outstanding contributions in commerce, medicine, politics, sports, entertainment and community enrichment."

looking for a restaurant that the AAA people had recommended. We didn't find it, so we had lunch at Shining Reflections Tea Room for $13.13 (double what we paid yesterday at McDonalds but still not expensive).
Menu

Menu

Tearoom

Tearoom


I was not absolutely sure (until I looked up the information on the internet) but I suspected that this restaurant was a training site for mentally/physically handicapped persons. Their website says "Training in Tea Room includes waitressing, baking skills, cash register skills, serving customers, food service and prep., janitorial, hostess, and daily operations of a business."
They are only open for breakfast and lunch. M-F 08:00 AM to 03:00 PM
I had a Hawaiian Chicken salad plate and Bob had a hamburger.
Hawaiian chicken salad plate

Hawaiian chicken salad plate

Sign in the Restroom

Sign in the Restroom


Town square decorated for Memorial Day

Town square decorated for Memorial Day

Heliocopter flies over the town

Heliocopter flies over the town

American's Hometown Banner on light posts

American's Hometown Banner on light posts

"America's Hometown"

"America's Hometown"


The banners on the light standards proclaim that this is "America's Hometown". But there are many places that claim this honor (Charles City, Iowa; Cordell, Oklahoma; Muncie, Indiana; and Hannibel, Missouri among others)- East Liverpool is not the only one.

Except for the banners, the only reference I find to the title is on the web page of the Ohio Valley College of Technology which says

"Welcome to one of America's best technology schools located in America's "home town", East Liverpool Ohio.

Then we visited the Ceramics museum which is a 'Must See' in East Liverpool. It cost us $6.50 each and was quite interesting. The Ceramics museum is across the street from the AAA office. The Ceramics museum is housed in the old city post office..
Local cab in front of the Ceramics Museum

Local cab in front of the Ceramics Museum


Our tour began with a viewing of a 35-minute film presentation on the history of East Liverpool and the pottery industry. The film explained the differences in the manufacture of pottery from primitive yellow ware on through the more automated and refined products to the point when they were producing Lotus Ware..

After that we walked around the museum for about an hour and looked at photographs, pottery examples that the film had explained to us

Pottery with iris

Pottery with iris

Commemorative plates

Commemorative plates

Belleck pottery - with a lacy texture

Belleck pottery - with a lacy texture

Mugs

Mugs


Map of pottery factory layout

Map of pottery factory layout


and the life-size dioramas depicting the jigger shop, kiln and decorating shops.
Jigger Shop Diorama

Jigger Shop Diorama

Kiln area diorama - transporting box on the head

Kiln area diorama - transporting box on the head

Decorating Area Diorama

Decorating Area Diorama

Recreation of a sales office with samples

Recreation of a sales office with samples

]Cardboard cutout of a pottery worker

Cardboard cutout of a pottery worker

Ceramic Museum ceiling

Ceramic Museum ceiling


The museum webpage says that ceramic manufacturing was more important in East Liverpool during the late-nineteenth century than is steel production in Pittsburgh or automobile manufacturing in Detroit today.
Street from Ceramics Museum

Street from Ceramics Museum


After we left East Liverpool, we drove on up towards Youngstown where we got on the Ohio Turnpike (I-80) at 1412 (2:12 pm) which is a toll road. We went west for $2.85 worth to Elyria
Sign at Ohio Turnpike rest stop

Sign at Ohio Turnpike rest stop


When my Dad and Mom drove us out west in 1948, we stopped in Elyria to visit some friends of theirs. Later, when I was a student at Oberlin, Elyria was a sign that I was near to my home away from home. When we could get a ride, a friend and I would occasionally go to Elyria to church because neither of us found a church home in Oberlin.

Elyria was founded in 1816 at the location of two Black River waterfalls on an old Indian trail. Mr. Herman Ely build a sawmill here. It's now the county seat of Lorain Co., maybe because Mr. Ely donated land for the courthouse. That courthouse is now listed on the National Historic Register. Also in Elyria is the Hickories Museum, the restored home of industrialist and pioneer automaker Arthur Garford. His mansion is the headquarters for the Lorain County Historical Society.

We arrived at the Super 8 Motel and checked in at 1534 after a day's trip of 246 miles.
Sign

Sign

Entrance

Entrance


This Super 8 was supposed to have a heated pool, and it was a bit more expensive than last night's motel in Morgantown as it was $75.54 with tax. I checked the pool temperature, but I do not think it was heated.
Pool

Pool


The motel itself was better built than the Super 8 in Morgantown, but it wasn't a purpose built Super 8.

The hotel was in a depressed looking area, right off I-80, and the girl on the desk did not seem to know how to give directions when I called, but we found it anyway.

We went out to find a place to eat dinner, and apparently turned the wrong way and had an unenlightening tour of the industrial and residential part of Elyria for 9 miles before we found our way back to the shopping center/eating area. We ate dinner at Fazoli's for $11.61.
Bob walking in

Bob walking in


Part of the menu board

Part of the menu board

Bob getting drinks

Bob getting drinks

Counter and additional menu

Counter and additional menu

Bob's sphagetti and meatballs

Bob's sphagetti and meatballs


Saturday, May 29, 2004

At 0930 Saturday, after a free breakfast, we checked out. We also found out that we could have also gotten directions for the various restaurants last night, but did not because the girl at the desk was uncommunicative and unhelpful. After we got fuel (9.6 gals at $1.71/gal) we set off for Oberlin.
Elyria water tower

Elyria water tower


We drove in past Presti's . We used to have to cycle or walk out here to get a drink in my time, and there were stories of guys that got disoriented and ended up riding around and around the running track until they sobered up enough to figure out where they were. I understand the there is drinking on campus now, in addition to the fact that they allow students to have cars.

We drove by Tappen Square and noted that there were traffic lights on the corners.
Corner May 2004 with traffic light

Corner May 2004 with traffic light


I called the reunion folks on the cell phone to ask directions and where to park, and was told that we could park anywhere that there were not "No Parking" signs including in back of Stevenson in the faculty parking lot. So that's what we did, and for the rest of Saturday we walked everywhere.
Stevenson Hall - new since my time

Stevenson Hall - new since my time


We checked in at Stevenson and got the magnetic keys which allowed us to get into the college building, and also got large name tags to hang around our necks which were color coded according to class. Ours were red.

Then we walked across the street to the reunion check-in and got our room assignment and key. One of the guys doing the check-in used to be at WOBC when I was there. We got a place-mat with the old buildings on it, and the new ones overprinted in red. Some of the buildings were still there but were repurposed
Severence Chemistry Lab

Severence Chemistry Lab


Severence Chem Lab was the scene of some of the low points of my college life. My organic chemistry grades were so bad that I did not know if I would graduate. It was also where the statue of Charles Martin Hall was originally housed.

Severance Chemical Laboratory was the gift of Mr. Louis H. Severance, of Cleveland. The construction was begun in 1899, and the corner stone was laid May 31, 1900. It was dedicated with appropriate exercises September 26,1901. The total cost, including the site, was $75,000. Mr. Severance also provided an endowment of $45,000 for the Chair of Chemistry, and a laboratory fund of $10,720 for the Department of Chemistry.

The Severance Chemical Laboratory is constructed of Ohio sandstone, and is located at the northwest corner of Lorain and Professor Streets. It consists of two wings at right angles to each other, each 72 feet long two stories in height, connected by a tower 27 feet wide and three stories in height. Severance now houses the offices, classrooms, and laboratories of the college's Psychology Department. Chemistry is in the new science building.
Warner Gymnasium

Warner Gymnasium


Ground was broken for Warner Gymnasium in August, 1900. It was named in honor of its donors, Dr. and Mrs. Lucien C. Warner, of New York, who provided $45,000 for the building together with an endowment fund of $5,000. They also funded Warner Hall (which was the main Conservatory building on the corner of College Street). An addition to the gymnasium, also provided by Dr. and Mrs. Warner, was completed in March 1912, costing $35,000. Warner Gymnasium was constructed of Ohio sandstone. Patton, Fisher and Miller, of Chicago, were the architects, and George Feick, of Sandusky, the builder.

[Warner Center now houses home to the College's theater and dance department. The second floor holds several practice and performance spaces, while faculty offices can be found on the first floor, along with the box office, with changing rooms and storage areas on the first floor and in the basement.]

And some buildings are just completely gone like
Wright Zoological Laboratory replaced by Bibbins Hall - part of the Conservatory

Wright Zoological Laboratory replaced by Bibbins Hall - part of the Conservatory


This was the building where all of the zoology classes were held. It was named in honor of Albert A. Wright who was Professor of Geology and Natural History for thirty-one years. Natural History was probably what they called Biology in those days. It was originally built as the Second Congregational Church between 1867 to 1870, and was used until the union of the First and Second Churches in 1920. The College purchased the building in 1927, removed the steeple, and remodeled the building as a temporary home for the department of Zoology. The choir loft had been converted to a classroom. We sat in tiers looking down on the professor. There was also another classroom. The five labs were in the basement and the library/reading room and offices were in the former pastor's study area. There was a large auditorium where the main part of the church was, and the floor around the edge and in the gallery was occupied by the Zoological Museum which had a lot of stuffed and preserved animals.

This building was not in use when the top picture was taken. It was already scheduled to be torn down.(August 1959). Currently the site is occupied by Bibbins Hall of the Conservatory complex. Now the Zoology department is called the Biology Department and is in the brand new Science building. Some of the old stuffed animals are in display cases there.
Finney Auditorium was still there

Finney Auditorium was still there

Peters Hall was also still there. Ground was broken for Peters Hall in the spring of 1885. It was dedicated January 26, 1887 which makes it one of the oldest buildings still in use on campus. The total cost was about $75,000. Peters Hall is constructed of stone, three stories in height, and was the main classroom building of the College of Arts and Sciences. Its most striking feature is its central hall and stairs, two stories in height. It contained also the Physics laboratories, special accommodations for work in Astronomy, and offices. My freshman advisor had his office in Peters. The Auditorium, formerly known as Bradley Auditorium, now accommodated portions of the laboratory equipment of the departments of Psychology and Physics. I had a psych experiment which required that I had access to Peters at all hours, so I had a building key when I was a senior.

Peters Hall was recently renovated (1997), and now holds state-of-the-art language labs, language department offices and, at the top of the building, an observatory and viewing deck. The Residential Life, Student Academic Support, and Student Academic Affairs offices are also located in Peters.
1540579-Peters_Hall_2004_Oberlin.jpgPeters Hall

Peters Hall

The dorm room we were assigned was on the third floor which created a problem for me because I don't do stairs well and there are no elevators. But we went back to the car and shlepped our stuff up the steps.

We had brought a fan but it was cool and we didn't need it, but it wasn't so cool that we needed extra blankets. Our room had a phone jack, but no phone. Bob got a phone from the car so that we could use the phone line in the room, and I figured out how to use the internet on my computer from there too.

I found out where my college roommate was staying on the second floor of the same dorm we were in, but she was out.
6132844-Back_of_Dascomb_2004_Oberlin.jpgBack of Dascomb 2004

Back of Dascomb 2004


So we walked over to Dascomb and had lunch in the cafeteria.
Dascomb Dining Room

Dascomb Dining Room


Lunch was $13.13 for the two of us (exactly what it was yesterday). It was a flat rate for whatever you wanted to eat. I kept an eye out for my roommate there, but she had gone down to the Tank co-op and had lunch there.
Tank Hall in 2004

Tank Hall in 2004


Then, since she had expressed a desire to take the tour of the new science builting, we started towards it.

On the way, we saw these folks setting up telescopes on the lawn, and stopped and looked at sunspots, and corona etc.
Astronomers setting up behind Peters 2004

Astronomers setting up behind Peters 2004

Astonomy set-up for reunion week

Astonomy set-up for reunion week


It was clear when we were there - my roommate came by later and she said it was too cloudy to do anything when she was there.

We went over to the Carnegie building (formerly the Library)
Carnegie Library spring 1959 with forsythia 2004

Carnegie Library spring 1959 with forsythia 2004


because the Conservatory reunion lunch was there, but I did not see my friend there.
in front of Wilder 2004

in front of Wilder 2004

Science building

Science building


Then we went into the new science building and I walked around the building on my own for a bit until it was time for the tour.
Charles Martin Hall's statue

Charles Martin Hall's statue


Charles Martin Hall was born December 6, 1863 in Thompson, Ohio. He was son of Rev. Heman Bassett Hall (1823-1910, A.B. 1847, B.D. 1850, A.M. 1866) and Sophronia H. Brooks Hall (1827-1885, Class of 1850, Lit. Course). In 1873 the Hall family moved to Oberlin, Ohio, where Charles Martin Hall supplemented his education by one year in the Oberlin Academy including lessons in the Conservatory of Music. He enrolled in Oberlin College in 1880, and graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in 1885. He was a member of the Oberlin College Board of Trustees from 1905 to his death in 1914. Hall was influenced by his college chemistry professor, Frank Fanning Jewett (1844-1926). Jewett is popularly credited with turning Hall's attention to aluminum through a classroom challenge. However, this story appears to contain more myth than fact.

After graduation Hall continued the work in his Oberlin woodshed laboratory with encouragement from his older sister Julia Brainerd Hall (1859-1926). On February 23, 1886, Hall successfully electrolyzed alumina in a mixture of cryolite and aluminum fluoride, producing several small globules of aluminum metal. On July 9, 1886, he filed a patent for "The Process of Reducing Aluminum by Electrolysis." Hall was a great benefactor of Oberlin, and he was honored by having a statue cast in aluminum which was on display in the chemistry building Severence Hall. Aluminum being very light, his statue was often stolen and placed in compromising situations (like in an outhouse on Peters steps). So the statue was glued to a large granite block and sits more permanently on the second floor of Oberlin's new science center, where students continue to decorate Hall with appropriate trappings on holidays.

When my roommate didn't turn up, we went and sat in this seminar for awhile.
6132649-Seminar_2004_Oberlin.jpgSeminar discussion in new science building

Seminar discussion in new science building

Front of the seminar room

Front of the seminar room


I left just before she came from her tour of the new Environmental building.

After we left the discussion, I found out that my other good friend from Freshman Year was also at this reuinion, and I tried to find where she was staying and could not.

We went back to the dorm, and I left a post-it note on my roommate's door. She called me, and we met in the third floor lounge and talked quite a long time. Now that we can e-mail each other, we are in much more frequent contact - it used to be snail mail at Xmas .
nImage030.jpg
She was staying for the whole weekend, but since she lives in Indiana, it's only a couple of hours drive for her.

We walked over to the picnic together with her and her husband.
Union Street

Union Street


2004-field

2004-field


2004 Walking to the picnic Sat

2004 Walking to the picnic Sat

6132891-Field_house_Oberlin.jpg2004 Field House

2004 Field House


She had not expected it to be so cool, and she had mostly packed warm weather clothes. I did have a sweater with me.

All classes were at the picnic, which was a kind of 'all you can eat' buffet. They gave us a wristband when we entered which showed that we had paid and were of age to get alcoholic beverages. There were no non-alcoholic or non-carbonated beverages except water. Seating was by cluster.
2004 inside the field house

2004 inside the field house


2004 Saturday reunion 'picnic'

2004 Saturday reunion 'picnic'


We had a nice time and the picnic and I also caught up with my other good friend. [I found that she was staying in a motel out of town because her husband was afraid to stay where there was no A/C.]

Afterwards, we went back to the dorm. My friend was going to a movie or a concert. I considered going to the class party, but I was tired, and, so Bob and I walked around the square and I took some more pictures.
Bob crossing the street

Bob crossing the street

"Downtown" with tables at Gibson's

"Downtown" with tables at Gibson's

Gibson's

Gibson's

Historic Elm site and Carpenter Block

Historic Elm site and Carpenter Block

Street with stores

Street with stores

Sidewalk sign in town and bike rack

Sidewalk sign in town and bike rack

1511477-Storefront_Oberlin.jpgStorefront

Storefront

Storefront

Storefront

Bead Paradise window

Bead Paradise window

Another storefront

Another storefront

2004 Apollo Theatre marque

2004 Apollo Theatre marque


Oberlin’s best loved historic commercial structure is the 1913 Apollo Theatre. It has housed Oberlin’s first 300-seat theatre and in 1928, the talkies were introduced to Oberlin here. The building was built by Mr. Hobbs, who operated the eastern storefront as the well-appointed Hobbs Restaurant and Bakery. An elegant evening out in Oberlin was dinner at the Hobbs followed by a play, or movie at the Apollo. In 1917 the building was sold to Ira West, who owned another silent movie theatre, The Rex, on South Main. In 1923 the Steele family, who still owns and operates the theatre today, purchased it.

The 1930s style remodel with black vitrolite, black and red brushed aluminum, and a tile walled ticket booth makes this one of Oberlin’s special buildings. If you want to go out of an evening and don't want to attend a play or concert at the college, then this is about it for night life. They used to show "The Wizard of Oz" every fall. From1949 to 1952 (when Hall Auditorium was built) performances of the Oberlin G&S group were held in the Oberlin High School Auditorium or in the Apollo Theatre, At present "Pagan Movie Night" meets at the Apollo for a movie on the first Tuesday of each month. [It doesn't matter what movie is playing]

Oberlin Inn

Oberlin Inn

Hall Auditorium

Hall Auditorium

Allen Art Museum

Allen Art Museum

Former Theology Building

Former Theology Building

catering tents with Peters in background

catering tents with Peters in background

Cox Administration Building

Cox Administration Building

New Library

New Library

Talcott dorm

Talcott dorm

Wright Physics Lab

Wright Physics Lab

6132858-Another_view_of_the_bandstand_Oberlin.jpgClark Bandstand - Tappen Square

Clark Bandstand - Tappen Square

1540574-Tappan_Square_Oberlin.jpgTappen Square being readied for graduation

Tappen Square being readied for graduation

Sunday, May 30, 2004

Sunday morning early, we checked out of the dorm and gave back the magnetic keys. I accidentally left my sweater in the room, which I didn't discover until that night.

Bob then drove around
Art building from the street

Art building from the street


Tappen Square Boulder

Tappen Square Boulder

from a car driving by

from a car driving by


and so I could take a picture of Tank Hall (from the car) where I lived as a Freshman,
Tank Dorm in 1959

Tank Dorm in 1959


Tank Hall ( formerly Tank Home) was built at 110 East College Street in 1896 as a home for children of missionaries of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. It was named in memory of Mrs. C.L.A. Tank of Green Bay Wisconsin, who gave $10,000 toward its construction. For ten years, 1922 to 1932, it was used as a hall of residence for women. After three years, it became a freshman women's dorm for forty-seven women. All the women were freshmen except for the junior counselors.

Now forty-two students live in Tank, and an additional forty take meals in the co-op.
This large old house is located on the east side of campus in a residential section of town. The dining room is paneled with wood, and the huge front porch (with swing) and spacious lawn are popular places to relax. Menus at Tank tend to be varied (which is probably a polite way of saying that sometimes it's not edible.) The students that live and board at Tank are part of the 582-member Oberlin Student Co-operative Association (OSCA) which is the largest co-op program of its kind in the country. In addition to Tank, it includes three other housing and dining co-ops (Harkness, Keep, and Old Barrows), and four board-only co-ops (Fairchild, Baldwin, Kosher Co-op, and Third World House). Students involved in a co-op typically work from four to six hours each week, preparing meals, washing dishes, and, in room-and-board co-ops, cleaning hallways and bathrooms.
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Charles Martin Hall house

Charles Martin Hall house


and I also got a photo of Charles Martin Hall's house which I didn't know what it was until I looked at the photo afterwards. We then drove down to Westervelt, and I got out and took some photos.
2004 Westervelt Building

2004 Westervelt Building


We left town by way of Ohio route 58 toward Wellington. We took Ohio 58 south out of Oberlin to Pittsfield and then to Wellington. I didn't like the Ohio Turnpike and didn't want to go back that way. The road is flat, straight, rural and has no traffic this early on Sunday morning.
Dairy Farm north of town

Dairy Farm north of town


I read information out of the AAA book as we drove through. Although Wellington is only a couple of miles south of Oberlin, without a car (and women were not allowed to own any motorized vehicle) it might as well have been on the moon, and I do not remember ever visiting. Wellington Ohio was settled in 1818 by Ephraim Wilcox, Charles Sweet, William T. Welling, and John Clifford, among others. The township was organized three years later in 1821. The Wellington name honored William Welling, one of the original settlers, and also honored the "Iron Duke," the Duke of Wellington. The teams in Wellington are apparently named "The Dukes". The water tower has a picture of a 'Duke' on it
Wellington water tower

Wellington water tower


and some of the houses in town have a football with a local player's number on it. After Dr. D. Z. Johns was instrumental in getting the railroad run to Wellington (right through the center of town) in 1850, John Swift was elected the first mayor in 1855. Among the local businesses was one of the most powerful manufacturers of carriages in the world, the E.S. Tripp Carriage Works.
Coming into Wellington

Coming into Wellington

Wellington was the "Cheese Capital of the World" from around 1868 until about 1910. because the railroad gave good transportation out of the area because the rich fields allowed large dairy farms.
Railroad line

Railroad line


In 1878 alone, 6,465,674 pounds of cheese were shipped out of Wellington along with 1,001,661 pounds of butter. One of the largest of the more than 40 cheese companies was Horr, Warner & Company.
street Scene

street Scene

Wellington town hall built in 1885

Wellington town hall built in 1885


According to the History of Wellington: "It is a little known fact that the railway mail catcher was invented in Wellington. L.F. Ward was contacted by the postal service about figuring out a way for trains to pick up and deliver mail without slowing down. He came up with the idea and built it. After finding that the device worked wonderfully, he patented the idea."

Other Wellington claims to fame include being the home of Myron T. Herrick and Archibald M. Willard
Museum from the car

Museum from the car


If Wellington has a 'must-see', this is it. It's about the only thing to see in Wellington as far as I can determine. Wellington is very proud of the fact that it was the home of Archibald M Willard between 1855 and 1875. Archibald M. Willard spent much of his life painting in Ohio and he painted the famous "Spirit of '76" in 1875 after the death of his father. This museum has a copy of the painting along with many paintings by Willard, and Revolutionary and Civil War artifacts. There is another copy in the town library. We did not stop, but I took a photo as we drove by. The museum has no website as far as I can determine. The museum is free. After we left Wellington, we drove south on Ohio 58 and then turned east going around Lodi. At 1009 after 47 miles, we picked up I-76 near Westfield Center and went south around Akron.

We stopped for lunch at McDonalds ($8.35) at 1130 just before the end of the Ohio turnpike (124 miles) and paid $2.75 toll (individual toll stations of $1, $1 and 75 cents which we were not prepared for) before finally exiting the toll roads in Pennsylvania at 1350. Leaving Ohio and proceeding east, I accessed the MS roads program and could not find any place to stay south of Fort Necessity. I DID want to stop at Ft. Necessity since we had gone there on our honeymoon 45 years earlier. I wanted to go as far as possible towards home, but it looked like Uniontown was the only place to stay in the area, even though that left the majority of the trip for the next day. I also knew that the Motel 8 was full for that night.

From here we went to Uniontown to spend the night.
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When my son and DIL were living in Pittsburgh, we would drive up from Baltimore to see them. Most of the time, people went up Route 70 and took the Pennsylvania Turnpike. But we usually went on up I-68 and turned off to go north to Uniontown on US Route 40 (the National Road). We went around Uniontown on the bypass, and came into Pittsburgh from the south. But, I always thought Uniontown looked like it might be an interesting place, so this time we stopped here for the night.
House outside Uniontown advertising tattoos

House outside Uniontown advertising tattoos

We got to Uniontown and registered at the Hampton Inn
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(the Super 8 across the road was full) by 1416 after 231 miles. The Hampton Inn is on the west side of town right on Route 40.
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The Hampton Inn was a bit more expensive than the Super 8. We had a double queen, non-smoking with AARP discount for $89.10 plus tax, but I like it better. This hotel has an indoor pool which is open from 6 am to 10 pm. and was right down the corridor from our room. There were free local calls to the surrounding area so I could access the internet from my room and the staff are nice and helpful. The beds were comfortable and there was no noise problem. The Hampton Inn also gives you more than the absolute minimum of towels and their in-room info had local restaurant numbers and menus. Within .6 mile you can dine at Bob Evens, Ponderosa, or Red Lobster. There is also a Marathon gas station across the way.,

We rested a bit, and I did email. Then we drove out to Searight Toll House on the National Road
National road through rain spotted windshield

National road through rain spotted windshield


Mileage marker

Mileage marker

Mileage marker and National Road sign

Mileage marker and National Road sign


A 90-mile stretch of the Historic National Road in Pennsylvania has been designated as the National Road State Heritage Corridor. The National Road was the first federally funded road in the United States. A portion of the road is currently known as Route 40. There are four historic eras:

  • Early Trails & Military Roads (pre-1800) Nemacolin's Trail and Mingo's Path. Some of this road was originally built by Washington prior to the French and Indian War.
  • Construction of the National Road (1806-1835). In 1806, President Thomas Jefferson signed the Act to construct this highway, with strong urging of Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury and the "father" of the National Road. Gallatin was a Swiss imigrant who served thirteen years as Secretary of the Treasury during the Jefferson and Madison administrations. In that time he reduced the national debt, purchased the Louisiana Territory and funded the Lewis & Clark exploration in addition to getting the National Road funded. His home is a museum near Uniontown.
  • Toll Road Era (1836-1900)
  • - Automobile Era (1900s on)

In Pennsylvania, the corridor passes through the historic districts of Uniontown, Brownsville and Washington. Other small communities (formerly pike towns) include Addison, Beallsville, Centerville, Claysville, Hopwood, Scenery Hill and West Alexandria. The annual National Road Festival is held every year on the third weekend in May. A wagon train comes into town, which sounds really interesting.
National Road with sign

National Road with sign


Coming toward tollhouse from the east

Coming toward tollhouse from the east

Tollhouse next to the road

Tollhouse next to the road


Searights Tollhouse was built in 1835 and was restored in 1966 which is was listed on the National Registry. It is an octagonal builting in the Greek Revival Style which is 5 miles west of Uniontown on US Rte. 40 (the National Road in Menallen Township, Fayette County
Foundation Material: Stone
Roof Material: Shingle
Exterior Wall Materials: Brick
Stories: 2
The sign on it said it was a museum, but no hours were posted. It was certainly closed when we went.
Plaque on tollhouse

Plaque on tollhouse

Top of the toll list

Top of the toll list

Bottom of the toll list

Bottom of the toll list

Sign with toll house behind it

Sign with toll house behind it

Tollhouse

Tollhouse


and then had an early dinner at Coal Barons restaurant.
Heliopad

Heliopad


We saw this restaurant as we drove into Uniontown on Route 40. It is about 2 miles from the Hampton Inn. Valet parking is available. There was also an old heliopad behind the parking lot. The sign has CoalBaron as all one word.
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This is a nice restaurant with table cloths and real glasses. The decorations included lights outlining the mine head machinery which is behind Bob.
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The menu has a coal miner on it.
Menu

Menu


The entrees included soup, salad, a vegetable, and a starch, in addition to the entree. A dessert was also included in the price.
For the soup, I had
Clam chowder

Clam chowder


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I had the orange roughy stuffed with crabmeat, and
Twice baked potato for $18.95

Twice baked potato for $18.95

The meal for the two of us (drinking iced tea was which was $41.82 plus an $8.00 tip.

Then we went into town to get fuel
Coming into town on Route 40

Coming into town on Route 40


(only Sweet Peas/Marathon had diesel and it was $1.83/gal for 8 gals)
Storefront with local people

Storefront with local people


and drove around in historic downtown Uniontown

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Fayette Bank Building

Fayette Bank Building


The historic district is the original area of the town (which was roughly Main St., between Court St. and Mill St.). Uniontown was founded July 4, 1776 (so Independence Day is a double birthday here - the country and the town). Uniontown became the county seat of the new county of Fayette in 1783. The original historic district was expanded in the 90s to an area between 9 E Peter St. 18 N Beeson St.

Walking tour brochures are available by contacting the Uniontown Downtown Business Authority. Historic buildings, churches, and houses date back to two eras of great prosperity, National Road days, 1818-1853; and the Coal and Coke Boom, 1880-1950. There are 234 buildings identified as being within the district, but not all of them are historic.

Old West School at dusk

Old West School at dusk


Closeup of Old West school

Closeup of Old West school

Cemetery from the car

Cemetery from the car

Great Bethel Baptist Church

Great Bethel Baptist Church

St. Peter's Episcopal Church

St. Peter's Episcopal Church

Trinity United Presbyterian from the back

Trinity United Presbyterian from the back

World War I monument

World War I monument


Uniontown is the birthplace and boyhood home of General George C. Marshall, Army chief of staff in World War II, Secretary of State and Defense, and Nobel Prize winner. It is now the VFW Home. A memorial in his honor has been built on the triangular plot across the Street from the VFW Home, across from the World War I "doughboy" monument. Both sites were decorated with flags because it was Memorial Day.
Monument

Monument

Posted by greatgrandmaR 19:32 Archived in USA Comments (0)

Visiting the Necessity

George Washington's Only Defeat


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & Bermuda & 2004 Peripetic Summer on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

In the colonial times in the USA, the privies (or what we called outhouses) euphemistically called "Necessaries".

Memorial Day - May 31, 2004

We loaded our stuff in the car and checked out after breakfast at 0837. The breakfast had three kinds of juice (cranberry, apple and orange) three kinds of cereal (fruit loops, cheerios and a flake) with two kinds of milk, coffee and decafe, plus hot water for tea (with various types available), or hot cereal, hard boiled eggs, a toaster in which to do waffles or french toast with syrup, pancakes to be done in the microwave, fresh fruit (apples and oranges), bagels and cream cheese, muffins, donuts, biscuits and creamed chipped beef.
Breakfast at the Hampton Inn

Breakfast at the Hampton Inn


We drove out Route 40
The Summit Inn sign

The Summit Inn sign


toward Farmington through Chalk Hill
Chalk Hill

Chalk Hill

Stone House Restaurant

Stone House Restaurant


and past General Braddock's Grave (which we really didn't see because of the rain although that was an interesting story). Major General Edward Braddock (January 1695 – 13 July 1755) was a British officer and commander-in-chief for the 13 colonies during the actions at the start of the French and Indian War (1754–1763) which is also known in Europe and Canada as the Seven Years' War (1756–1763). This is the War which had it's inception in the Battle of Great Meadows at Fort Necessity. He is generally best remembered for his command of a disastrous expedition against the French-occupied Ohio River Valley then in western Virginia or Pennsylvania in 1755, in which he lost his life.

Braddock, rallying his men time after time, fell at last, mortally wounded by a shot through the chest. Braddock was borne off the field and died on 13 July. Before he died Braddock left Washington his ceremonial sash that he wore with his battle uniform and muttered some of his last words, which were 'Who would have thought?' Reportedly, Washington never went anywhere without this sash for the rest of his life. Braddock was buried just west of Great Meadows in the middle of the road and wagons were rolled over top of the grave site to prevent his body from being discovered and desecrated by the Indians. George Washington presided at the burial service, as the chaplain had been severely wounded. After the French and Indian War ended, the Braddock Road remained a main road in this area. In 1804, some workmen discovered human remains in the road near where Braddock was supposed to have been buried. Officer's uniform buttons reportedly found at the site indicated that the remains were those of General Braddock. The remains that were recovered were then re-interred on a small knoll adjacent to the road. In 1913 the marker was placed where it is today.

General Braddock's Grave concealed by the rain

General Braddock's Grave concealed by the rain


Even though it was threatening rain, we visited Fort Necessity National Battlefield (The battle fought near here in 1754 launched the French and Indian War). Mt. Washington Tavern is also on the site.

We got to Ft. Necessity just before 0900. In 1959, when we returned from Oberlin on our honeymoon (after I graduated), we visited Fort Necessity. We weren't sure if the Visitor's Center (which was not here in 1959) would be open on Memorial Day,
Fort Necessity from the Visitor's Center

Fort Necessity from the Visitor's Center


so I walked over
Visitor's Center with flag at half staff

Visitor's Center with flag at half staff


and took this picture from in front of it. Just about that time, the ranger arrived.
Reflection in Visitor's Center

Reflection in Visitor's Center


We went in and saw the film which may have had much of the information about the history of the battle. At this time, the English and the colonials (Washington and the Virginia troops) were on one side, and the French from Canada were on the other side. There were apparently Indians fighting on both sides.

Virginia colonial Lieutenant Colonel George Washington was sent by Governor Robert Dinwiddie as an emissary in December 1753, to deliver a letter asking the French to leave the Pittsburgh area. Washington returned to Williamsburg and informed Governor Dinwiddie that the French refused. Dinwiddie ordered Washington to begin raising a militia regiment to hold the Forks of the Ohio, in present-day Pittsburgh. He also sent Captain Trent to build a fort there. Dinwiddie issued these instructions on his own authority, without even asking for funding from the Virginia House of Burgesses until after the fact. The Canadians tore down the British works, and began construction of the fort they called Fort Duquesne.

In March 1754, Governor Dinwiddie sent Washington back to the frontier with orders to "act on ..any Attempts are made to obstruct the Works or interrupt... You are to restrain all such Offenders, & in Case of resistance to make Prisoners of or kill & destroy them". Dinwiddie's instructions, which were issued without the knowledge or direction of the British government in London, have been interpreted as "an invitation to start a war". Washington was ordered to gather as many supplies and paid volunteers as he could. By the time he left for the frontier on April 2, he had gathered 186 men. On May 23, the French commander sent Joseph Coulon de Villiers de Jumonville with 35 men to see if Washington had entered French territory, and with a summons to order Washington's troops to leave; this summons was similar in nature to the one Washington had delivered to them four months previous. Captain Trent arrived with news of the advance of the French force under Jumonville. Trent was accompanied by Tanacharison, who promised warriors to assist the British. To keep Tanacharison's support, Washington decided not to turn back, choosing instead to build a fortification now known as Fort Necessity at Great Meadows 37 miles (60 km) south of the forks and await further instructions. In the Battle of Jumonville Glen. Washington ambushed the French, killing 10 to 12, wounding 2 and capturing 21. Among the dead was Jumonville. After that, Washington expected the French to retaliate.

Path from Visitor's Center to Fort

Path from Visitor's Center to Fort

Visitor's center from the fort

Visitor's center from the fort


Fort Necessity

Fort Necessity


Bob walking out to the fort in the rain

Bob walking out to the fort in the rain

Looking down from the bridge

Looking down from the bridge

Looking toward the fort from the woods

Looking toward the fort from the woods

Washington's soldiers build the fort

Washington's soldiers build the fort


After encountering and dispatching the French party led by Jumonville, Washington returned to the Great Meadows and fortified his position by building a stockade and earthworks around his storehouse. When he built the fort there were only 160 men with Washington. A few days later, 100 British regulars under the command of James Mackay arrived, but, instead of making camp with the Virginians, they camped separately outside the fort.
British Defense

British Defense


Washington had heard that there were 500 poorly supplied French troops at Fort Duquesne. So he had his troops building roads for better access to the site. On June 28, after a council of war, Washington ordered the withdrawal to Great Meadows. That same day 600 French, and 100 Indians left Fort Duquesne led by the slain Jumonville's older brother, Louis Coulon de Villiers. In order to keep ahead of the French/Canadian force, the Virginians had to abandon most of their supplies. On July 1, they reached Fort Necessity. At Fort Necessity, the provision hut was depleted, and there was little shelter from the heavy rain that started to fall on the 2nd. With the rain, the trenches that Washington had ordered to be dug had turned into streams. Washington realized that he would have to defend against a frontal assault and also realized that it would be difficult because the woods were less than 100 yards away (within musket range), making it possible for a besieging attacker to pick off the defenders. To improve the defense, Washington ordered his men to cut trees down and to make them into makeshift breastworks

French and Indian attack

French and Indian attack


By 11:00 am on the 3rd of July 1754, Louis Coulon de Villiers came within sight of Fort Necessity. At this time, the Virginians were digging a trench in the mud. The pickets fired their muskets and fell back to the fort, whereupon three columns of Canadian soldiers and Indians advanced downhill towards the fort. However, Coulon had miscalculated the location of the fort and had advanced with the fort at his right. As Coulon halted and then redeployed his troops, Washington began to prepare for an attack.
Coulon moved his troops into the woods, within easy musket range of the fort. Washington knew he had to dislodge the Canadians and Indians from that position, so he ordered an assault with his entire force across the open field. Seeing the assault coming, Coulon ordered his soldiers, led by Indians, to charge directly at Washington's line. Washington ordered the men to hold their ground and fire a volley. Mackay's regulars obeyed Washington's command, and supported by two swivel cannons, they inflicted several casualties on the oncoming Indians. The Virginians, however, fled back to the fort, leaving Washington and the British regulars greatly outnumbered. Washington ordered a retreat back to the fort.
Coulon reformed his troops in the woods. The Canadians spread out around the clearing and kept up heavy fire on Fort Necessity. Washington ordered his troops to return fire, but they aimed too high, inflicting few casualties, and the swivel cannon fared no better.To add to the garrison's troubles, heavy rain began to fall that afternoon, and Washington's troops were unable to continue the firefight because their gunpowder was wet.
Truce negotiations

Truce negotiations


The battle of Fort Necessity ended when Colonel George Washington of the Virginia Militia and Captain John Mackay of the British Regulars surrendered to the French forces. The terms of the surrender, or Capitulation, were written in French. The document refers to the assassination of the French officer, Jumonville, in the second paragraph and in article seven. Washington denied the killing was an assassination, claiming his translator rendered the word as "loss" or "death of". On the 17th, Washington delivered his report of the battles to Governor Dinwiddie, expecting a rebuke, but Washington instead received a vote of thanks from the House of Burgesses and Dinwiddie blamed the defeat not on Washington but on poor supply and the refusal of aid by the other colonies
Ft. Necessity stockade

Ft. Necessity stockade


Crossing the earthworks

Crossing the earthworks

Swivel gun

Swivel gun

Swivel gun from next to stockade

Swivel gun from next to stockade

Stockade, trench and one swivel gun

Stockade, trench and one swivel gun


We went inside the stockade.
Looking through gate to storehouse

Looking through gate to storehouse

Looking in gate - Bob beside storehouse

Looking in gate - Bob beside storehouse

Peeking out to swivel gun from stockade

Peeking out to swivel gun from stockade

Small storehouse inside the stockade

Small storehouse inside the stockade

Stockade gate from inside

Stockade gate from inside

Split rail fence from the trail

Split rail fence from the trail

Fort Necessity from beside the Visitor's Center

Fort Necessity from beside the Visitor's Center


We walked back and then I took the path partway up towards the Tavern.
Sign at bottom of walk

Sign at bottom of walk

Trail up to Mt. Washington Tavern

Trail up to Mt. Washington Tavern

Tavern from the Visitor's Center trail

Tavern from the Visitor's Center trail


The Tavern is part of the Ft. Necessity 'complex' (which includes Braddock's Grave and Jumonville Glen in addition to Ft. Necessity) and was being opened by the park ranger at 10:00 for a program. Mount Washington Tavern was one of many taverns located along the National Road, which was the first highway built by the Federal government. It was a brick and stone building - built about 1828,which was during the heyday of the National Road. James and Rebecca Sampey and their family owned and operated the Mount Washington Tavern which catered to the stagecoach clientele and was serviced by the Good Intent Stagecoach Line. This tavern owes its name to George Washington, who returned 15 years after the Ft. Necessity battle to purchase the land which he owned until his death in 1799.

Prosperity along the National Road came to an end with the coming of the railroad. In 1855 the executors of the James Sampey estate sold the Mount Washington properties to Godfrey Fazenbaker who lived in the Tavern for over 75 years. The Tavern now has a Barroom, Parlour, Dining Room, Kitchen and some bedrooms open to the public. The original kitchen would have been in the basement, and there would have been more sleeping area in the attics which are now principally used for storage. It is furnished to show how it may have appeared during the1828-1855 timeframe. The Mount Washington Tavern is open for tours only

We left a little before 10
Leaving Ft Necessity

Leaving Ft Necessity

Exit US 40 east

Exit US 40 east


and continued down Route 40 and joined up with I-68 after we crossed into Maryland.
Camping in the rain

Camping in the rain

Cumberland

Cumberland


It continued to rain. At Hancock, in order to avoid going through Baltimore or Washington, we exited I-68 and crossed into West Virginia on US 522.
Fog

Fog


We stopped at 1143 in the rain in Berkley Springs for lunch at McDonalds. Then we went on through Winchester Virginia. In order to avoid Washington D.C., we went down to Fredericksburg
Virginia Route 3 south of Fredericksburg

Virginia Route 3 south of Fredericksburg


and crossed over the Potomac on the Governor Nice Bridge
Potomac River sign

Potomac River sign

Sign leaving Virginia

Sign leaving Virginia

Sunny Skies

Sunny Skies

Governor Nice Bridge

Governor Nice Bridge

Governor Nice Bridge

Governor Nice Bridge

Morgantown power plant

Morgantown power plant


and were back in Maryland by about 1745.
Landing in Maryland

Landing in Maryland

Morgantown power plant

Morgantown power plant


----------------------------------------
This was a fairly inexpensive long weekend trip. Five days and four nights.
Lodging for 4 nights - $276.00 This included breakfast for three mornings.
Fuel (diesel) was about $42.00
Food from lunch Thursday to lunch Monday $190.00 although I do not know what we did for breakfast on Sunday - maybe we skipped it.
Extras - Registration, tolls, museum admission $68.60
Total $577.00

Posted by greatgrandmaR 12:30 Archived in USA Comments (2)

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